Pasture Renovation Workshop – June 1

Pasture renovation, a common issue among livestock producers, will be discussed by Central New York Beef Producer members and Cornell Cooperative Extension specialists on June 1, at 6:30 p.m.  The educational meeting will be held on the Vibbard Farm, 1655 County Highway 19, in Burlington Flats.  To ensure adequate meeting materials and refreshments for participants, please pre-register by calling CCE at 607-547-2536, (ext. 0) or by e-mailing otsego@cornell.edu.

Jeff Vibbard will discuss his pasture and cropland reclamation efforts used in providing forages for his 75 cow beef herd.  Jeff actively moves his cattle through multiple paddocks, which provide fresh nutritious forage throughout the growing season.  Kevin Ganoe, CCE Central NY Dairy and Field Crops Specialist, will speak about forage crop management and how plant survival and development can be enhanced through appropriate fertilization and harvest efforts.

Cornell University Cooperative Extension Beef Specialist, Dr. Mike Baker, will address beef cattle nutrition needs and gains in feeding programs based primarily on pasture and grass.  Robert Weaver, Grazing Technician from the Otsego County Soil & Water Conservation District, will be on hand to guide the conversation about the intensive rotational grazing.

For more information, contact Bill Gibson, Extension Educator, CCE Schoharie and Otsego Counties, 123 Lake St., Cooperstown, NY 13326; 607.547.2536 (x226); or email wrg56@cornell.edu.

To learn more about Cornell Cooperative Extension visit us on the web at http://cceschoharie-otsego.org. Cornell Cooperative Extension is an employer and educator recognized for valuing AA/EEO, Protected Veterans, and Individuals with Disabilities and provides equal program and employment opportunities. Accommodations for persons with special needs may be requested by contacting Cornell Cooperative Extension Schoharie and Otsego Counties prior to a program.

Vermont Beef Producers Pairs, Feeders & Stockers sell this Saturday

Vermont Beef Producers Board Sale Lot 1 – 23 cow/calf pairs – selling during Spring Feeder/Stocker sale this Saturday at 11:30am

23 Head Black and Black Baldy Cows (One Red) of Angus-Based Genetics
Medium Frame Cows with an estimated weight range between 1000-1200 lbs
Muscle Scores: 1-2
Average Flesh Condition
Young to Middle Age, Mostly Young Cows
Sound: Good Feet / Good Udders
Bred to a Black Bull
45 day Calving Window (70% have calved the rest due within 2-3 weeks)
Cows were Pregnancy Checked in February
Cows Vaccinated with Cattle Master Gold and Inforce 3 for IBR, BVD I&II, PI3, and Lepto

Video at https://youtu.be/ThIAQ36nvTE

156 other pre-conditioned, weighed and graded cattle will be sold at this sale, at Champlain Valley Exposition – Essex, Vermont this Saturday May 21, 2016. All details at www.vtbeef.org.

To Register and Bid on cattle over the phone please use our call line number at +1 (314) 627-1506 Access Code 463-960-480. Make sure to call in 10 minutes early to register for a buyer number.

VBPA WEBSITE:  www.VTBeef.org

Chip Morgan, President, VBPA

Cornell App for predicting hay harvest date

Cornell University has developed a new web-based app that helps time first-cut harvest by estimating the NDF (neutral detergent fiber) content of alfalfa-grass mixtures. The app works on a computer or smartphone. Though targeted for dairy, delaying the predicted date by a few weeks should increase yield and produce a nutrient quality suitable for beef cows.  If you are finishing cattle on forage, this tool will help to predict best time to make baleage for wintering calves. For details go to http://blogs.cornell.edu/ccefieldcropnews/2016/05/10/new-alfalfa-grass-ndf-estimation-tool-for-smart-phones/.

 

Harvest New York Notes – MacKenzie Waro

Harvest NY is working closely with Northern NY and Central NY extension specialists, businesses, and producers regarding meat processing and marketing. The meat industry is experiencing growth and added interest in the production and availability of locally sourced meats and meat products. The prospect of new processing capacity in many parts of New York as well as the development of enhanced educational programs in meat processing at SUNY Cobleskill presents an opportunity for enhanced capacity to support this growth. MacKenzie, Harvest NY’s Livestock Processing and Marketing Specialist has been working with processors and producers to under-stand the strengths and weaknesses in the processing process; from slaughter to fabrication. This past quarter, MacKenzie has been involved in producer meetings. These meetings ranged from beef genetic talks and sheep wool pooling; to Beef Quality Assurance training and farm business summary training. SUNY Cobleskill and Harvest NY is working on a Beef Cutting class, set for May 25. This all-day class is designed for producers who are selling to markets, would like to learn to cut their own meats, or are interested in learning the cuts of beef. The morning classroom session will comprise of the cuts of beef, quality of meat, and marketing your cuts. Participants will spend the afternoon learning the correct way to cut a beef carcass to get the most value for your beef. This is the initial step in a positive partnership to add additional classes for producers raising and marketing other meats and meat products (lamb, pork, shelf stable, and charcuterie). On March 17, Bill Gibson and MacKenzie met with the Leatherstocking Shepherds group to discuss strengths and opportunities within the local lamb and wool markets. It was an informative meeting, and we are all looking forward to working together in the future. New York is home to many diverse meat markets; from farmer’s markets and freezer trade to large city markets. New York has an opportunity to fulfill many markets while allowing for our livestock producers to expand their operations or become more specialized and Harvest NY is there to help see our livestock meat industry grow.

MacKenzie Waro

mlw55@cornell.edu

May Beef Month: Farm to Food Bank Initiative!

“New York Beef Council in partnership with Empire Livestock Marketing, DFA and NY Beef Producers encourage New York’s beef and dairy farmers to donate cattle sale proceeds.”

May is Beef Month in New York State. The New York Beef Council is leading beef industry awareness month with an unprecedented “Farm to Food Bank” initiative to combat hunger.  NYBC has partnered with Empire Livestock Marketing, DFA (Dairy Farmers of America) and NY Beef Producer’s Association encouraging beef and dairy farmers to donate cattle sale proceeds for the purchase of beef for five regional food banks across New York State.

From May 1 through May 31st Empire Livestock Marketing will assist NYBC in collecting contributions from one of nine livestock auction markets across the state.  Beef and dairy farmers will have five levels of donations from which to choose or can designate their own dollar contribution.  All monetary donations will be solely for the purchase of beef and will benefit 54 of the 62 counties in New York State!  The donations generated will help ensure more protein will reach families and individuals in need.  Each dollar donated will provide 3-4 meals to an adult/child in need.

“Farmers and ranchers are known for serving their communities in many ways.  NY Beef Council and Empire Livestock Marketing have teamed up to allow a way to give back to those in need of the food bank in their areas.” states Patty Bikowsky, owner of Sweet Meadow’s Dairy Farm, Chairman of the NY Beef Council, member of the Cattlemen’s Beef Board and DFA member.  Peter Ricardo, Product Donations Manager for the Food Bank of CNY,  goes on to add, “We continue to be humbled and impressed by the generosity and compassion in our community.  We thank you on behalf of the many families and individuals that have a need for our services.”

Farm to Food Bank will be posted on New York Beef Council’s Instagram, Facebook and Twitter (@NYBeefCouncil) pages as a means to reach out to our farmers to encourage participation. #Farm2FoodBank

* For more information and donation form:

 

Tri-County Graziers Twilight Pasture Walk

Join the Tri-County Graziers for their first pasture walk of the season Thursday, June 9th; 6:30 – 8:30 pm at Fieldstone Acres; 5363 County Route 12; Campbell, NY 14821.  Fieldstone Acres is an expanding grass-fed beef and animal welfare certified grazing operation that utilizes a variety of innovative pasture improvement and herd improvement strategies.  Come network with other graziers, and share your thoughts and ideas with local experts from Cornell Cooperative Extension and the Upper Susquehanna Coalition.  This pasture walk is free and open to the public.  For more information, please contact Cornell Cooperative Extension of Steuben County at: 607-583-3170, or by email: ksb29@cornell.edu

$3 corn??

Another bumper corn crop looks on the way for the 2016-17 marketing year, projected at 14.4 billion bushels, up 829 million from last year and 214 million higher than the previous record set in 2014-15, USDA said in its monthly World Agricultural Supply and Demand Estimates report.

“The key as always is that yield number, which is highly dependent on late June and July weather,” noted Steve Meyer and Len Steiner Inc., in their Daily Livestock Report. “The reason why corn markets remain bearish for now is due to the combination of a large carryover (1.8 billion bushels) and projections for a +14 billion bushel crop. Livestock producers can absorb more … at the right price. But even with higher use, ending stocks for 2016-17 are projected at almost 2.3 billion bushels. If correct, this would imply a stocks-to-use ratio of over 16 percent. And that kind of ratio, if it ends up being true, could quickly lead you toward $3 corn.”

(Source: , May 10, 2016, NewsMakers PM from meatingplace.com)

Beef Cutting Workshop – May 25

Harvest New York and SUNY Cobleskill invite beef producers to hone their skills in a one-day Beef Cutting Seminar on May 25, the first in a new series of meat production classes to be offered throughout the year. The course will be taught by SUNY Cobleskill faculty, and specialists from the Harvest New York program of Cornell Cooperative Extension.
The all-day class is designed for producers who are selling to markets, would like to learn to cut their own meats, or are interested in learning about cuts of beef. It will cover which cuts are most profitable, quality of meat, what products consumers want, and marketing strategies. Participants will learn about the cuts of beef and marketing in a morning classroom session before applying that knowledge in the afternoon to cut a cattle carcass.
The event comes amidst growing consumer interest in the production and availability of locally sourced meat and meat products in New York. It is the first step in a partnership that will host classes for other meat producers, including lamb, pork, shelf stable, and charcuterie.
“The partnership between Harvest NY and SUNY Cobleskill is wonderful. SUNY Cobleskill has the facilities to help Harvest NY meet its educational goals for meat processing education, while Harvest NY has the ability to grow the meat industry in the state. We are looking forward to a mutually beneficial long-term relationship,” said MacKenzie L. Waro, Livestock Processing & Marketing Specialist for Harvest New York.
Harvest New York’s goal is to expand and enhance Cornell Cooperative Extension’s regional agriculture programs to spur agricultural development in New York State. Harvest New York specialists develop educational programs that increase agricultural investments, profitability and sustainability.
The seminar will be held Wednesday, May 25 from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. at SUNY Cobleskill’s new Meat Laboratory, in the College’s Center for Agriculture and Natural Resources. The cost is $50 per person, which includes lunch and classroom materials. Space is limited to 15 participants.

Brochure found here Beef_Cutting_Workshop.

To register or for more information, call Linda Serdy, Office of Professional and Continuing Education (PACE), 518.255.5528 or SerdyML@cobleskill.edu.